The world’s deepest zoo harbors clues to extraterrestrial life – my first piece for kids

Roundworms on a biofilm deep underground in a South African gold mine. Credit: Gaetan Borgonie

I’m excited about the publication of my first piece for kids, about the World’s Deepest Zoo, written for Science News for Students.

It covers the same topic as my Smithsonian piece from last year, i.e. life living deep beneath the Earth and […Read More]

Ants, impostorism and a few more updates

It’s been a while since my last update, although this time I have a better reason than usual for being so busy-my wife and I were blessed with a lovely baby girl a few months ago! Between frantically trying to finish up assignments before she was born, and then being busy/sleep-deprived taking care of a newborn, I haven’t had much of a […Read More]

How the tiny parasite Toxoplasma alters its host’s behavior

Scanning electron micrograph of a Toxoplasma gondii tissue cyst in the brain of an infected mouse. Credit: David Ferguson / EurekaAlert.org

Scanning electron micrograph of a Toxoplasma gondii tissue cyst in the brain of an infected mouse. Credit: David Ferguson / EurekaAlert.org

It’s been a while since I received my PhD, but I finally got around to writing an […Read More]

How the gut “tastes” parasites, blood vessels “see,” and kidneys “smell” fatty acids and regulate blood pressure in response

Tuft Cells in the gut "taste" parasites

Tuft Cells in the gut “taste” parasites

In my latest feature for The Scientist Magazine, I wrote about how sensory receptors — the light, taste, and odor receptors that are primarily present in our eyes, tongues, and nose — are present all over the body, and have all kinds of functions.

It turns […Read More]

An online feature about deep life for Smithsonian

Nematodes (blue) wiggle inside a stalactite from a South African gold mine in this image taken with an electron microscope. (Credit: Gaetan Borgonie)

Nematodes (blue) wiggle inside a stalactite from a South African gold mine in this image taken with an electron microscope. (Credit: Gaetan Borgonie)

I just got done with a Smithsonian feature on microbes that live in extremely inhospitable […Read More]

Keeping busy, writing about molecular biology for BioTechniques

Developing Drosophila Embryo (Credit: Credit: Raghav Chhetri, Fernando Amat, Yinan Wan, Burkhard Höckendorf, William Lemon & Philipp Keller, Janelia Research Campus.)

Developing Drosophila Embryo (Credit: Credit: Raghav Chhetri, Fernando Amat, Yinan Wan, Burkhard Höckendorf, William Lemon & Philipp Keller, Janelia Research Campus.)

I’ve been meaning to update this website for a while, unfortunately I’ve been too busy writing articles to do so.

Among […Read More]

When it comes to echolocation, some bats just wing it

Although fruit bats such as this one were thought not to be able to echolocate, new research finds that some fruit bats can use sonar clicks from their wings to navigate in the dark. Credit: Current Biology, Boonman et al.

Although fruit bats such as this one were thought not […Read More]

Boring wasp not so boring

A parasitic wasp prepares to drill into a fig. Photograph by Lakshminath Kundanati

A parasitic wasp prepares to drill into a fig. Photograph by Lakshminath Kundanati

I’ve been a little slow to post these past few weeks, just busy with summer activities. I wrote another story for National Geographic’s “Weird & Wild” blog, about the parasitic fig wasp’s metallic ovipositor tip. The […Read More]