The world’s deepest zoo harbors clues to extraterrestrial life – my first piece for kids

Roundworms on a biofilm deep underground in a South African gold mine. Credit: Gaetan Borgonie

I’m excited about the publication of my first piece for kids, about the World’s Deepest Zoo, written for Science News for Students.

It covers the same topic as my Smithsonian piece from last year, i.e. life living deep beneath the Earth and the scientists […Read More]

Ants, impostorism and a few more updates

It’s been a while since my last update, although this time I have a better reason than usual for being so busy-my wife and I were blessed with a lovely baby girl a few months ago! Between frantically trying to finish up assignments before she was born, and then being busy/sleep-deprived taking care of a newborn, I haven’t had much of a chance to […Read More]

How the tiny parasite Toxoplasma alters its host’s behavior

Scanning electron micrograph of a Toxoplasma gondii tissue cyst in the brain of an infected mouse. Credit: David Ferguson / EurekaAlert.org

Scanning electron micrograph of a Toxoplasma gondii tissue cyst in the brain of an infected mouse. Credit: David Ferguson / EurekaAlert.org

It’s been a while since I received my PhD, but I finally got around to writing an article about […Read More]

How the gut “tastes” parasites, blood vessels “see,” and kidneys “smell” fatty acids and regulate blood pressure in response

Tuft Cells in the gut "taste" parasites

Tuft Cells in the gut “taste” parasites

In my latest feature for The Scientist Magazine, I wrote about how sensory receptors — the light, taste, and odor receptors that are primarily present in our eyes, tongues, and nose — are present all over the body, and have all kinds of functions.

It turns out taste […Read More]

How scientists can get credit for peer review: Science Careers article

Thanks to all the time I spent getting my PhD, I’ve maintained an interest in writing about careers in science, especially articles that might be helpful for graduate students and postdocs.

I wrote this article for Science Careers about different platforms (such as Publons, Elsevier’s Reviewer Recognition Platform) that allow scientists to get credit for peer review. It was very interesting to learn about these services, and I hope the article is helpful for early career researchers. You can check it out here.

Keeping busy, writing about molecular biology for BioTechniques

Developing Drosophila Embryo (Credit: Credit: Raghav Chhetri, Fernando Amat, Yinan Wan, Burkhard Höckendorf, William Lemon & Philipp Keller, Janelia Research Campus.)

Developing Drosophila Embryo (Credit: Credit: Raghav Chhetri, Fernando Amat, Yinan Wan, Burkhard Höckendorf, William Lemon & Philipp Keller, Janelia Research Campus.)

I’ve been meaning to update this website for a while, unfortunately I’ve been too busy writing articles to do so.

Among other things, […Read More]

When it rains, it pours: my article about the monsoons and floods in India

Indian floods

Indian floods

This article on flooding in India and Pakistan has been a long time coming. I did the bulk of the reporting last year right after the devastating September 2014 floods in Kashmir, only for the article to get delayed until now.

Floods occur every year in South Asia, causing widespread damage and loss of life. Unfortunately it […Read More]

A foggy feature

Coastal fog along California's Pacific Coast Highway. Credit: Sandeep Ravindran

Coastal fog along California’s Pacific Coast Highway. Credit: Sandeep Ravindran

Here’s a longer feature article that I wrote for The Verge, a science and technology site that I read fairly regularly.

The article is about researchers who are developing more efficient […Read More]