The world’s deepest zoo harbors clues to extraterrestrial life – my first piece for kids

Roundworms on a biofilm deep underground in a South African gold mine. Credit: Gaetan Borgonie

I’m excited about the publication of my first piece for kids, about the World’s Deepest Zoo, written for Science News for Students.

It covers the same topic as my Smithsonian piece from last year, i.e. life living deep beneath the Earth and the scientists […Read More]

Ants, impostorism and a few more updates

It’s been a while since my last update, although this time I have a better reason than usual for being so busy-my wife and I were blessed with a lovely baby girl a few months ago! Between frantically trying to finish up assignments before she was born, and then being busy/sleep-deprived taking care of a newborn, I haven’t had much of a chance to […Read More]

An online feature about deep life for Smithsonian

Nematodes (blue) wiggle inside a stalactite from a South African gold mine in this image taken with an electron microscope. (Credit: Gaetan Borgonie)

Nematodes (blue) wiggle inside a stalactite from a South African gold mine in this image taken with an electron microscope. (Credit: Gaetan Borgonie)

I just got done with a Smithsonian feature on microbes that live in extremely inhospitable environments deep […Read More]

How scientists can get credit for peer review: Science Careers article

Thanks to all the time I spent getting my PhD, I’ve maintained an interest in writing about careers in science, especially articles that might be helpful for graduate students and postdocs.

I wrote this article for Science Careers about different platforms (such as Publons, Elsevier’s Reviewer Recognition Platform) that allow scientists to get credit for peer review. It was very interesting to learn about these services, and I hope the article is helpful for early career researchers. You can check it out here.

Keeping busy, writing about molecular biology for BioTechniques

Developing Drosophila Embryo (Credit: Credit: Raghav Chhetri, Fernando Amat, Yinan Wan, Burkhard Höckendorf, William Lemon & Philipp Keller, Janelia Research Campus.)

Developing Drosophila Embryo (Credit: Credit: Raghav Chhetri, Fernando Amat, Yinan Wan, Burkhard Höckendorf, William Lemon & Philipp Keller, Janelia Research Campus.)

I’ve been meaning to update this website for a while, unfortunately I’ve been too busy writing articles to do so.

Among other things, […Read More]

This Software Makes You Forget You’re Wearing Headphones — My article about 3D audio

Photo by John T. Consoli

I got a chance to write another longer piece, this one about 3D audio and how it can make headphones sound more like real life, particularly important for virtual reality and augmented reality. It’s been a while since I last wrote a tech-focused article, and this was also my first piece for […Read More]

Article about an insect-sized flying robot for Motherboard

Robotic fly with pyramidal onboard sensor on top

Robotic fly with pyramidal onboard sensor on top

I wrote my first piece for Motherboard, Vice magazine’s online science & technology site. I just happened to find a pitch that worked well for them, and it was fun to write a more technology-related article […Read More]

A science story from The Hindu that I sent in to the Science Journalism Tracker

The Hindu, the venerable Indian newspaper that I grew up reading (and that first introduced me to science journalism), still continues to publish plenty of science stories both online and in print. I found out about one of their recent stories on turning “light into matter” not from the story itself (which was quite confusing) but due to a response from The Hindu’s Reader’s Editor.

In his post, the Reader’s Editor A.S. Panneerselvan (whose name is misspelled in the post itself…) mentioned a bad example used in the science story and went on to […Read More]